The Only Tree Services Guide You’ll Ever Need

Expert arborists answer all your questions on tree services costs, laws that apply to you and what to look for when hiring a professional arborist.

Below you will find a comprehensive guide on all things related to tree services. At Treesafe, we are expert arborists who work across Brisbane and Gold Coast on residential and commercial projects.

We’ve taken our years of experience and the most frequently asked questions we get and provided in depth answers for you below. We’ve even given you in depth resources relating to the laws around tree removal in the areas we are most acquainted with.

If you can’t find the answer to a question you have below, reach out to our friendly experts on 1300 55 40 48 today! We’re always more than happy to help.

Tree Removal & Tree Services FAQ

Find out everything you’ve ever wanted to know about who is responsible if a tree causes damage, how much tree services cost, what the law says about removing a tree on your property plus more!

Tree Services FAQ

Neighbour Disputes

Trees are a very common cause for disagreements between neighbours. In particular, common disputes include:

  • Branches hanging over your fence
  • Fruit dropping on your side of the fence
  • Roots encroaching on your property and causing damage
  • Trees blocking sunlight, reception for antennas or solar panels
  • Trees that have fallen over and caused damage
  • Trees that look like they are about to fall over and cause damage

There are a few things you can do if your neighbour’s tree is affecting your property. It is, however, always best to have clear communication with your neighbour and find a resolution that you both agree on. In some cases, it may help to know how the law can support you.

Read on for answers to common problems we get asked about.

Can I cut my neighbour’s tree roots?

Yes, you may trim the roots of a tree up to the boundary line of your property so long as the tree is not under a vegetation protection order and doing so won’t cause significant harm to the tree. You must stay on your property to do the trimming and cannot injure or cut down a significant amount of your neighbour’s tree.

Can I cut my neighbour’s overhanging trees?

Generally, yes, you can if the tree isn’t under a vegetation protection order. As with cutting roots, make sure to only cut overhanging branches up to the boundary line of your property. You must stay on your property to do the trimming and cannot injure or cut down a significant amount of your neighbour’s tree.

You don’t have to return the lopped branches to your neighbour but you may do so if you like.

Removing Tree

Whose responsibility is it?

It can be tricky to know who is responsible for a tree and the damage it may cause. Find out answers to common scenarios between neighbours or questions you may have about trees on council property.

Who is liable if my tree falls on my neighbour’s property?

If the tree is entirely or mostly situated on your land then you are legally recognised as the tree keeper and it is your responsibility. Even if the tree is on a boundary line where most of it grows on your land, you would still be the tree keeper.

You are also the tree keeper if the tree was previously mainly situated on your land.

If it can be proved that a tree that was on your land and has damaged your neighbour’s land, you are still classed as the responsible tree keeper.

Queensland’s guidelines can be found here.

What happens if my neighbour’s tree falls in my yard?

If the tree was either entirely or mostly situated on your neighbour’s property, they are classed as legally responsible for the tree.

If the tree falls onto your property and causes damage, see if you can reach an agreement with your neighbour about who will cover damage repair costs. 

If you and your neighbour cannot come to a resolution about whose responsibility the damage is, you can reach out to a Government authority.

In Queensland, the Queensland Civil and Administrative Tribunal (QCAT) can help you resolve neighbourhood tree disputes. They can make legally enforceable decisions that are clear to all parties involved. It is always advised you try and work things out with your neighbour first.

What can I do if it looks like my neighbour’s tree will fall soon?

If your neighbour has a tree close to the boundary of your property and you are worried that the tree:

  • might seriously injure someone on your property
  • cause damage within the next 12 months
  • looks unsafe or unhealthy and may start dropping branches

Then, hire an arborist to inspect and report on the situation. This can help you take appropriate action to minimise the risk a dangerous tree can pose. Make sure you ensure the arborist has permission to enter your neighbour’s yard if needed.

In some cases, your neighbour may not be open to reaching an agreement with you about hiring an arborist but you still have serious concerns that the tree may cause damage. It is still worth ordering an arborist’s report as that can help you claim insurance compensation in the event the tree does cause damage to your property and you can prove that the neighbour chose to neglect the situation.

Can I trim or remove a tree on council land?

In general, you will need to seek approval to trim or remove a tree on council land. Here are some useful links if you are based in Queensland: Report a council tree needing trimming Report a council tree for removal For other areas, check the laws of your local council.

What are valid reasons for needing to remove trees in council areas?

The most common reason for removing city council trees relates to management or maintenance purposes. If a tree has died, is hazardous or immediately dangerous or if it encroaches on another’s property, it may be granted approval to be removed.

For any further questions about removing trees on council land, please contact our experts.

Approval for Council Tree Removal & Lopping Brisbane & Gold Coast

At Treesafe, we have worked closely with the city councils listed below and we’re happy to answer any questions you have about council tree removals in these areas:

  • Brisbane City
  • Gold Coast
  • Logan
  • Ipswich
  • Redlands
  • Beaudesert & Scenic Rim

Council approval and licensing is vital to the services we offer at Treesafe. In most cases, tree removals require council approval and it is likely to be the same for you no matter where you are in Australia.

Different councils have different specifications and requirements though, so make sure you keep this in mind before taking action.

What the law says

Do you have permission to prune or remove a specific tree? Is council approval needed before you do so?

Every local council is different so you will have to find the council nearest to your location to find the correct information that applies to you. If you’re based in Brisbane or Gold Coast, we have shared relevant information below from our experience dealing with these specific council departments:

  • Brisbane City
  • Gold Coast
  • Logan
  • Ipswich
  • Redlands
  • Beaudesert & Scenic Rim

In Queensland each local council manages their own laws and regulations around management of trees and vegetation in their district. Sadly, this makes it much harder to know what is allowed and what isn’t when it comes to the question of tree removal.

Tree Removal Law

If you’re based in a different state, check if your state has state-level laws that all councils follow as that could make things much easier for you!

What is the law against cutting trees on my property?

The law against cutting trees changes according to the council district nearest to the tree’s location. Some states in Australia have statewide laws though, in Queensland you will have to refer to what your local council permits.

There are some circumstances in which you can prune or remove a tree on your property without needing council permission. If the tree is not protected under a TPO or VPO and it is either dead or posing significant risk, it is likely you can remove the tree without permission.

It is still advised you check the laws of your local council to be sure.

Do I need a permit to cut down a tree on my property?

Perhaps. If the tree is protected under a vegetation protection order then yes, you are likely to need a permit.
Check the laws of your local council to ensure you have the correct information for your district.

 

Everything you need to know about tree removal

Can I remove a tree on my property without council permission?

Here’s everything you need to know about removing your tree, legally!

In most residential cases, there’s a good chance you can prune or remove a tree on your property without needing council permission.

Every council has what’s known as a Tree Preservation Order (TPO). The TPO outlines rules for tree maintenance and removal in your district and it is a good idea you take a look at this before taking any action.

In your council’s TPO, you’ll find out whether you need council approval or not.

Do I need a permit to cut down a tree on my property?

Perhaps. If the tree is protected under a vegetation protection order then yes, you are likely to need a permit.
Check the laws of your local council to ensure you have the correct information for your district.

 

PRO TIP:

Things like the tree’s proximity to your house, its size and the maximum percentage that can be removed from the canopy will affect whether you need council permission.

In General:

Trees under 5m in height or that are at least 3m away from your house’s foundation are likely not to need council permission. These distances will vary from one location to the next so be sure to double check! Make sure to also check if the tree species is protected under a TPO.

What if I need council permission for tree removal?

If your tree is not exempt from needing council permission, you need to make a formal application to the council before any work can start.

The easiest way to do this is to run a Google search like “apply to remove a tree” and add the name of your nearest council on the end. You’ll generally be taken to a page with relevant information and a form to download or complete online.

At Treesafe, we carry out inspections and provide reports to assist with council approvals in Brisbane and Gold Coast. Qualified arborists in your area should be able to do the same for you.

Valid reasons to have a tree removed

Removing a tree is no easy feat! Not only can it be a dangerous endeavour, but it can also be quite costly if you go about it in the wrong way.

Not only that, but there are also environmental considerations to account for. Trees form a vital part of our ecology and some types of trees are protected.

If you’re looking to remove a tree simply because it is lifting up a paved area or because it sheds into your gutters, it is unlikely that council will approve the removal. Most councils will do whatever they can to save a tree first and prevent unnecessary removals.

Having said this, there are a number of situations in which removing a tree is the best situation that can occur. These include if the tree is:

  • posing danger or significant risk
  • dead or dying
  • not structurally sound
  • infested by harmful insects
  • leaning, uprooted or looks like it is prone to fall over
fa-
Dead Trees

Generally speaking, dead trees are able to be removed without council approval. That’s not to say to go and poison the tree just so you can remove it. Rather, in the situation that you have a decaying tree in your yard, it is unlikely you’ll need to go through an approval process.

If the tree has not completely decayed, you might be best off pruning it first rather than going to the full extreme of completely removing it. You can also consult with a qualified arborist in case there is a way you can restore the tree’s health.

et-s
Dangerous Trees

Dangerous trees are those which have split trunks or are at risk of having falling branches and deadwood, especially if they are in locations where children or pedestrians frequently pass. If the tree has any degree of lean, this is another sign that it might pose danger to the people around it, especially if the degree it is leaning happened recently or seems to be getting worse.

What makes a tree safe?

In short, the healthier a tree is, the safer it is. Healthy trees have good, solid root systems, strong trunks and a healthy branch structure. Unhealthy trees or ones that have been poorly lopped or pruned in the past are the ones that can pose significant danger to people.

How can I tell if my tree is safe?

The best way is to have it inspected by an arborist at least once. It might even be worth having an aerial inspection done to ensure there are no defects that cannot easily be seen from the ground. Occasional inspections every year or so can also ensure the tree is still healthy. We would also suggest having your trees checked immediately after a strong storm or other extreme weather condition or if there has been any construction works completed near the tree.

Can I inspect my own tree?

Yes you can, though we always suggest getting an expert to assess your tree at least once as they can spot subtle hazards that you may not be aware of.

Here are some tips to help you spot major hazards and risks trees can pose

1

Look at your tree from a slight distance and see if there are any broken, dead or hanging branches that may fall

PRO TIP:

If there are broken, hanging or dead branches, section of the area under them so they do not fall on anyone

2

Walk around your tree to assess how it is growing and if is leaning in any particular direction

3

Check the root system for any lifted roots, cracks in the soil or other signs that the tree might be moving in the ground

PRO TIP:

Check the ground around the base of the tree for mushrooms and fungi that might indicate decay.

SUPER PRO TIP:

Look for any signs of construction in the greater area around the tree that may have impacted the tree’s root structure.

4

Starting at the base of the tree, inspect the trunk and assess if it has a good taper. Ideally it should be thicker at the base with some thicker, external roots to support it. As you look up the trunks, pay attention to any defects, signs of decay or infestations.

5

Next look at branch structure. Does the tree look balanced and structurally sound? This is where it helps to have an expert assess the tree as their trained eyes know what to look for.

PRO TIP:

Look for cracks, nests (especially termite nests), hollows, cavities or any other unusual holes or bulges. Mushrooms or fungi growing on the trunk can also be a sign of internal decay.

PRO TIP:

Look at how the branches attach to the tree. Are there a number of stems shooting out from one location? What about how the branch tapers? Is it thickest at the point it attaches to the trunk?

SUPER PRO TIP:

Also take a look at any splits or forks that may be present where the branch joins the trunk. Also look for any branches rubbing against each other or crossing over one another.

How much do professional tree services cost?

Prices for tree services including tree lopping, tree removal, stump removal and stump grinding vary depending on many factors. Find out some average prices below and an idea of how different factors affect price.

How much does a tree lopper cost?

The cost of tree pruning or trimming will vary depending on if you choose to do it yourself or if you hire a professional. Inexperienced pruning can not only damage your tree but also make it a safety risk for others, that’s why we always recommend hiring experts.

Depending on the size and location of your tree, you could be quoted anywhere from $75 to $1000+. The average price depends on many factors though would be around $500 with most expert arborists

There are so many variables that affect the cost of tree pruning. Tree size is one that has a major impact. It makes sense that a larger tree will cost more to trim than a smaller one.

Here’s a really rough guide of average prices based on tree size alone. Other factors may also affect the total price of the quote you receive.

  • Small trees: Can cost from $75 to $400+
  • Medium trees: Can cost from $150 to $800+
  • Large trees: Can cost from $200 up to $1,000+

Tree size is a significant factor affecting the cost though there are other considerations which can affect the final price. If you receive a quote from an arborist that seems unreasonable, ask what factors affected their pricing and see if there is valid reason to add an extra cost.

Factors that can add an extra cost to the quote include:

  • Emergency or storm response services
  • Clearing broken or dead limbs
  • The safety risk posed to the workers
  • Location of the tree and how easy it is to access
  • How long it has been since the previous pruning
  • How healthy the tree is
  • The company’s travel expenses
  • Whether workers have to climb the tree
  • The type of equipment needed for the job

Tree service professionals have access to equipment costing hundreds of thousands of dollars to ensure that, by the time they are done, your trees are in tip top shape. It is well worth having professionals handle pruning and tree removals for you and, ultimately, it is much better to be safe than sorry.

Tree Removing Cost

How much does it cost to get trees removed?

Cutting down a tree is no easy feat! The cost will depend on if you choose to do it yourself or if you hire a professional. Given it is such a dangerous task, we advise hiring professionals who can ensure the safety of nearby people, buildings and other structures.

Depending on the size and location of your tree, you could be quoted anywhere between $250 to $1000+. The average price would be around $450-$800 though there are so many other factors that influence this as well so make sure you consider these when asking for a quote.

Also consider the cost of having inexperienced people remove a tree. Inexperience can not only damage your tree but can put many people in harm’s way, that’s why we always recommend hiring experts.

There are so many variables that affect the cost of tree removal. Tree size is one that has a major impact. It makes sense that a larger tree will cost more to remove than a smaller one.

Here’s a really rough guide of average prices based on tree size alone. Other factors may also affect the total price of the quote you receive.

  • Small trees: Can cost from $250 and to $600+
  • Medium trees: Can cost from $450 up to $850+
  • Large trees: Can cost from $700 to $1,000+

Tree size is a significant factor affecting the cost though there are other considerations which can affect the final price. If you receive a quote from an arborist that seems unreasonable, ask what factors affected their pricing and see if there is valid reason to add an extra cost.

Factors that can add an extra cost to the quote include:

  • Emergency or storm response services
  • Clearing broken or dead limbs
  • Whether stump removal or grinding are also needed
  • The safety risk posed to the workers
  • Location of the tree and how easy it is to access
  • How long it has been since the previous pruning
  • How healthy the tree is
  • The company’s travel expenses
  • Whether workers have to climb the tree
  • The type of equipment needed for the job

Tree removal professionals have access to equipment costing hundreds of thousands of dollars to ensure that by the time they are done, your trees are in tip top shape. It is well worth having professionals handle pruning and tree removals for you and, ultimately, it is much better to be safe than sorry.

How much does it cost to grind or remove a tree stump?

As with most other tree services, there are so many factors that affect price of stump grinding & removal. As a general guide, removal of:

  • Small stumps (~50cm wide) can start at $100+
  • Medium stumps (~1m wide) can start at $170+
  • Large stumps (~2m wide) can start at $300+

Stump grinding can start from $200 to over $1000 depending on the size and other factors involved.

Prices include setup time which is why the cost per metre is reduced for larger stumps. Keep in mind this is only a guide and other factors will affect the final quote you receive.

Other factors affecting stump grinding price

Stumps and their root structures are quite different from one another. Different factors influence the price. Some typical problems stump grinders run into which affect price include:

  • Narrow access or space restrictions
  • Water or gas pipes near the roots
  • Cables or other underground structures
  • Sloping ground or steps make in harder to get the stump grinder into position
  • How close the stump is to a building
  • Nearby garden beds
  • Incorrect measurement of the stump (make sure to measure the widest point)
  • Proximity of builders rubble, stones, iron or concrete can slow down the process

Tree service professionals have access to equipment costing hundreds of thousands of dollars to ensure that, by the time they are done, your land is in tip top shape. It is well worth having professionals handle stump grinding and removals for you and, ultimately, it is much better to be safe than sorry.

What is the fine for cutting down or pruning a protected tree with a TPO?

Minor offences can attract on-the-spot- fines of $550. Such offences include interfering with a protected tree or removing small protected trees. The maximum penalty for breaching a tree Protection Order is $110,000 and if it escalates to the Land and Environment Court, penalties can reach $1.1 million.

How does pricing work for commercial tree services projects?

The tree service needs of commercial properties and projects are so varied it is difficult to offer a standard guideline. Pricing is determined based on consultation and an inspection of the property.

At Treesafe, we offer a free consultation to understand the needs of your project and provide a more accurate price guideline. You can speak with our arborists & land development experts who can answer all your questions. Feel free to call us at any stage on 1300 55 40 48.

Council Regulations and Information

In Australia, different states have different laws about tree removal and pruning, even for trees on your own property. In Queensland, there are no statewide laws and each council determines laws applicable to properties in their area. We’ve shared useful information and links for the councils we work with below.

  • Brisbane City
  • Gold Coast
  • Logan
  • Ipswich
  • Redlands
  • Beaudesert & Scenic Rim

If you are outside these areas, you can also find similar information for your area by visiting the website of your nearest council and searching for tree removal laws.

Council Regulations & Information
Tree Removal & Service Law

One of the most common questions we get asked is:

Are you allowed to cut down your tree in Brisbane?

In general, you can arrange tree removal in Brisbane without needing approval from the council if it meets these conditions:

  • is not protected vegetation and
  • is dead or
  • poses significant risk or danger (e.g. split trunk, leaning, dropping branches)

Here are some quick links to help you find Brisbane City Council’s Tree Regulations:

Specific regulations change between councils in Brisbane. It is always advised that you consult your nearest council about your specific situation before taking irreversible action!

You can also consult with our expert arborists who can provide a report to assist with any council approvals you might need.

Are you allowed to cut down your tree in the Gold Coast?

In the Gold Coast, you can generally remove a tree without council approval if:

  • The tree is dead or dying
  • The tree is within 3 metres of a house or building
  • The tree is on the local council’s exemption list
  • It is not a native, protected species or a significant tree

You can also prune up to 20% of the canopy every 12 months. It is always advised you check the council’s regulations to ensure you are in the clear before beginning any work.

Here are some quick links to help you find Gold Coast City Council Tree Regulations:

You can also consult with our expert arborists who can provide a report to assist with any council approvals you might need.

Logan Council Laws

With the exception of native and protected trees, there are certain instances in which you can remove trees on your property in Logan without needing council approval. Make sure to have a qualified arborist inspect the tree to ensure it is not a protected species.

Here are specific pages on the Logan council’s website with more information:

Redland Council Laws

In the Redlands area, you can remove trees without needing council permission if those trees are not subject to a protection order like a VPO or TPA and if they are not located within an environmental significance overlay zone outlined in the City Plan.

Dead trees on urban properties can also be removed as they pose high risk and there aren’t any sustainable management options available.

Check out these links for further helpful information:

Ipswich Council Laws

With regard to tree removal and clearing, Ipswich Council will likely need to offer approval, even if the tree is on your private property. This council protects trees and vegetation on private land in an effort to preserve the city’s:

  • Character
  • Biodiversity
  • Historical values
  • Ecological values
  • Amenity

If you are looking to remove any vegetation from your property, it is best to check if you need council approval as chances are that in Ipswich, you will. Factors like the zoning of your property and your ability to remain compliant with the Vegetation Management Code found in the Ipswich City Council Planning Scheme will affect whether you need to get approval or not.

Other handy documents include:

Scenic Rim & Beaudesert Council Laws

With the exception of native and protected trees, there are certain instances in which you can remove trees on your property without needing council approval. Rural properties have different rules to urban lots, so it is best you check all the rules related to your property using the Vegetation & Tree Clearing on Private Land document.

If there are trees on council land that are encroaching on your property, you can also submit an application for tree work or removal using this document.

What to Look for When Hiring for Commercial Tree Services

Tree Safety Around Schools, Golf Courses, Hospitals & Retirement Villages

Trees can pose a significant risk in a school, golf course, hospital or retirement village environment if they are damaged or not maintained properly. Falling branches and split trunks have lead to injuries, and even death, in the past.

Inspections from qualified arborists must be a part of routine safety and risk assessment protocols.

At Treesafe, we work with many schools, golf courses, hospitals and retirement villages around Brisbane and Gold Coast to ensure the safety of our community. We’ve seen how poor quality tree pruning and maintenance has impacted on safety and so we wanted to spread the word about what to look for when hiring an arborist for any kind of commercial tree services.

Tree Safety Around Schools
What tree services do schools, golf courses, hospitals and retirement villages need on a routine basis?

At the very least, routine tree inspections should be scheduled on an ongoing basis. Ongoing tree pruning, through a long term tree maintenance program, is also highly recommended to ensure clearance of utility services and buildings. When tended to by a qualified arborist, tree pruning also improves the safety, structure and health of a tree.

It is vital that trees on such properties are properly maintained as any structural damage or infections can easily result in falling tree limbs. We’ve witnessed the negative impact on a tree’s health when pruning and maintenance has been poorly executed.

As such, our team of expert arborists is dedicated and committed to ensuring every property we inspect is left with the healthiest trees possible and you should expect the same from the arborist you work with.

Are there any other vital tree services such properties need?

Although these aren’t necessary on a regular basis, having qualified arborists carry out tree removals, stump grinding and tree transplanting can add an extra layer of safety.

It is also worth ensuring that aerial inspections are carried out on occasion. An arborist can often gather much more information about the health of a tree and any risks it may pose than if they only ever inspect the trees from the ground.

PRO TIP:

Any trees that begin to show signs of decay, splitting or start leaning should be inspected immediately and may need to be removed. Ask for a report from an arborist to ensure that any risk posed by the tree is mitigated as early as possible.

What should be done about large trees in schools, hospitals or retirement villages?

With a routine maintenance program in place, expert arborists should be keeping an eye out for signs of danger or hazards large trees pose at least on a six-monthly basis. It also helps to have all people present at these facilities educated about tree safety.

Between professional inspections, and especially after big storms, your staff can use our safe tree checklist to inspect for signs of damage or other concerns.

If there are obvious signs of danger, especially following a storm, or other severe weather, it may be necessary to immediately prune or remove the tree in order to preserve the safety of the space.

What time of day is it best for an arborist to work at a school?

It is best for all arborist work to be completed outside of regular school hours. Not only is noise going to be a factor, there are also extreme risks due the the machinery we rely on and the presence of children.

PRO TIP:

We typically schedule school tree maintenance for school holidays, weekends (in special circumstances) or after school hours. We also work with schools to schedule inspections and routine maintenance in advance and in accordance with their annual calendar.

Tree Services for Government Agencies and Local Councils

Local governments and councils manage a vast amount of land areas that need to be inspected, maintained and adhering to safety regulations. It can be a tough job balancing the nurturing of protected vegetation and significant trees with the safety of the public.

Between council owned parklands, sidewalks, public areas, council owned properties and national parks, any council sure has their work cut out for them!

As qualified and highly insured arborists, we work directly with Brisbane & Gold Coast government agencies and councils on a regular basis. If you are a service provider working with councils and looking for tree experts to subcontract, here are some things to consider to find the best arborist for the job.

What tree services do councils need on a regular basis?

Given the large amount of land councils are responsible for, and the large amount of trees and vegetation on this land, there are a number of tree services councils require on an ongoing basis.

Regular inspections of trees in public areas, on sidewalks and in community parks are essential. Inspections, and the arborist reports that accompany them, provide insight into a tree’s overall health and how prone it is to insect infestation, disease or dropping heavy branches.

Regular pruning and maintenance is also essential to ensure trees do not interfere with power lines, utility structures or impact on any nearby buildings.

PRO TIP:

We offer long term tree maintenance programs to government agencies and councils which allow them to place the safety and maintenance of trees on autopilot. They trust our team as we are not only qualified. But we also upkeep regular training and ensure all our staff are insured appropriately.

How can arborists help governments and local councils execute TPOs and Local Development Plans?

As expert arborists, we have found that by working in accordance with local governments and councils, we are able to help execute some elements of TPOs and local development plans.

When we perform tree inspections for residential or commercial clients, we often identify protected vegetation and significant trees. Our services enable councils to nurture these trees and protected areas by keeping them as healthy as possible.

An arborist’s report also goes a long way towards assisting councils with assessing applications to remove dangerous yet protected trees and vegetation. In the event a significant tree needs to be removed because it is impacting on surrounding structures, our team are able to remove the tree and prepare it for transplanting or relocation if it is in good health.

What qualifications and insurances do arborists need to work on council projects?

Pruning and removing trees can be dangerous work. Our professional arborists are experts who have been trained in the latest safety measures for operating necessary machinery and ensuring safety while pruning, trimming, removing or otherwise managing trees (including stumps and roots).

In Australia, a formal license isn’t needed to do the work of an arborist. To work on council projects, however, it is imperative an arborist meets these minimum qualifications:

  • Current workers compensation insurance
  • Current public liability insurance to the value of $20 million
  • Minimum Certificate II in Horticulture (Arboriculture) for ground and climbing work
  • Minimum Certificate III in Horticulture (Arboriculture) for supervision of climbing work
  • Work is carried out to satisfy the WorkCover Code of Practice: Amenity Tree Industry 1998

At Treesafe, our team have all completed their Level 2 Certifications at minimum. Quite a few of our staff are qualified to Levels 3 & 4. Our staff also hold tickets in Level 1 & 2 Chainsaw operation, EWP tickets and truck licenses.

Tree Management Services for Land Developments, Strata and Real Estate Agents

Building contractors, property developers, strata and real estate agents have unique needs that arborists are qualified to help with. Land developments often require expert consultancy on tree placement and potential removal of existing trees that may be in the way of proposed plans.

Strata and real estate managed properties with trees on them are likely to need routine inspections and pruning in the case that the residents are not responsible for these activities.

At Treesafe, our consultants are able to provide our clients with expert land development insights and advice. We also partner with building contractors and real estate agencies to assist with any routine tree management services, council approvals and tree removals.

Why do you need to consult an arborist for land development projects?

Some areas of expertise arborists can offer for land development projects include:

  • Reports on the condition of existing trees
  • Securing council approvals
  • Tree retention and protection strategies

At Treesafe, we also provide information on tree species suitable to the site and we let you know if your planned work will impede on any zones. For instance, developments near the coast will need more salt tolerant plants than those further inland.

Will an arborist liaise with council on my behalf?

We can’t speak for all arborists here though at Treesafe, we assist you in this process. While we don’t handle all the communication on your behalf, we guide you in the right direction and provide any supporting documents and resources needed.

When it comes to developing land, council approval is all part of the process. If tree removal is required in order for your development to go ahead, we can also provide the necessary reports council will ask for.